Tuesday, 14 September 2010 18:00

Sir Fazle Hasan Abed among 27 Global Leaders appointed by UN Secretary-General to Head Worldwide Effort to Address Child Malnutrition

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The global Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement continues to gain momentum today with the convening of 27 leaders committed to advancing the strength and security of nations by improving maternal and child nutrition. This influential group, appointed by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to represent the many countries, organizations and sectors working to improve nutrition, will serve as strategic guides for this global Movement.

“Never before have so many leaders, from so many countries and fields, agreed to work together to improve nutrition,” said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “The Scaling Up Nutrition Movement gives all of us, including the UN, an opportunity to support countries in their efforts to end hunger and malnutrition.”

The members of the Lead Group include Heads of State from countries that have prioritized efforts to scale up nutrition, as well as representatives of the donor, civil society, business and UN system organizations that are aligning resources to help SUN countries drive progress. Members of the Lead Group are listed below: additional Members may be invited to join later.

The Group’s role is to ensure that the countries at the heart of the Movement are supported as they work to create tangible and sustainable improvements in nutrition. In addition to providing strategic oversight, the Lead Group will help to mobilize support and strengthen both coordination and accountability within the Movement. Twenty-seven countries have chosen to join the SUN Movement so far, with more set to join in the coming months.

Scaling Up Nutrition, or SUN, is a global push for action and investment to improve maternal and child nutrition. Evidence shows that proper nutrition during the 1,000 days between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s second birthday gives children a healthy start at life. Poor nutrition during this period leads to irreversible consequences such as stunted growth and impaired cognitive development.

Improving nutrition is a precondition to achieving goals of eradicating poverty and hunger, reducing child mortality, improving maternal health and combating disease—which all contribute to a stronger future for communities and nations.

“It is time to recognize nutritional status not only as a marker of progress in development, but also as a maker of progress – and a key to more sustainable development. We must invest now in programmes to prevent stunting or risk diminishing the impact of other investments in education, health and child protection,” said Anthony Lake, Executive Director of UNICEF, who has been appointed by Secretary- General Ban to chair the Lead Group.

SUN helps governments, civil society, businesses, development agencies, international organizations and foundations to synergize their support to communities as they reduce malnutrition – and demonstrate their results. By integrating solutions across sectors and creating new partnerships, SUN creates sustainable change and tangible results that no one programme, organization, business or government could achieve alone.

The diverse experience and expertise of the Lead Group reflect the core SUN principle that real progress can be made by engaging multiple stakeholders towards a common goal.

“This is a historic moment for nutrition,” said Dr. David Nabarro, Coordinator of the SUN Movement. “Today a group of world leaders pledges to work together to improve the nutrition of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable children. Their two-year commitment to SUN illustrates the urgency and priority that these leaders place on alleviating malnutrition, as well as a recognition of the incredible impact that improved nutrition could have on the future of both individuals and nations.”

Members of the Lead Group for the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement

SUN Countries

  • Mr. Armando Emílio Guebuza, President of Mozambique
  • Mr. Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete, President of Tanzania
  • Ms. Sheikh Hasina, Prime Minister of Bangladesh
  • Mr. Nahas Angula, Prime Minister of Namibia
  • Mr. Babu Ram Bhattarai, Prime Minister of Nepal
  • Ms. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Minister of Finance of Nigeria
  • Ms. Nina Sardjunani, Deputy Minister of Development Planning of Indonesia
  • Ms. Nadine Heredia, First Lady of Peru
  • Mr. Ibrahim Mayaki, CEO of NEPAD


Civil Society Organizations

  • Mr. Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder and Chairperson, BRAC
  • Mr. Tom Arnold , Chief Executive Officer, Concern Worldwide
  • Ms. Alessandra da Costa Lunas, Secretary-General, Confederation of Family Farmer
  • Organizations of the Extended Mercosur (COPROFAM)
  • Ms. Marie Pierre Allié, President, Médecins Sans Frontières France
  • Ms. Helene Gayle, President and CEO, CARE USA


Development Agencies

  • Ms. Beverley Oda, Minister of International Cooperation, Canada
  • Mr. Andris Piebalgs, Commissioner for Development Cooperation, EC
  • Mr. Bruno Le Maire, Minister of Food, Agriculture and Fishing, France
  • Mr. Rajiv Shah, Administrator, US Agency for International Development


Business

  • Ms. Vinita Bali Managing Director, Britannia Industries
  • Mr. Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer, Unilever


International Organizations

  • Ms. Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director, World Food Programme and Representative of the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition
  • Ms. Tamar Manuelyan Atinc, Vice President, Human Development, The World Bank


Foundations and Alliances

  • Mr. Chris Elias, President, Global Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Mr. Jay Naidoo, Chair of the Board, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition
  • Ms. Mary Robinson, Chair, Mary Robinson Foundation - Climate Justice


SUN Movement

  • Mr. Anthony Lake, Chair, Scaling Up Nutrition Movement Lead Group and Executive Director, UNICEF
  • Mr. David Nabarro, Coordinator, Scaling Up Nutrition Movement, and Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Food Security and Nutrition

 

Source: UNITED NATIONS

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