BRAC

BRAC

IMNCS

Improving maternal, neonatal and child survival (IMNCS) project is a comprehensive community based health intervention focusing on preventive and curative care with a group of trained community health workers under structured supervision and monitoring system. This comprehensive undertaking is uniquely designed to address the bottlenecks of demand and supply side for ensuring continuum of care from home to hospital. We are reaching around 25 million people living in rural areas of 14 districts (Nilphamari, Rangpur, Gaibandha, Mymensingh, Kurigarm, Lalmonirhat, Faridpur, Rajbari, Madaripur, Magura, Pirojpur, Joypurhat, Shaerpur and Shariatpur)  with maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) services.

Goal
To reduce maternal, neonatal and child mortality, particularly among the poor and socially excluded populations  

Objectives
•    Increase knowledge of and practices related to maternal, neonatal and child health
•    Improve provision of quality maternal, neonatal and child health services at household and community levels
•    Increase availability and access to a quality supplyof maternal, neonatal and child healthcare
•    Increase participation, accountability and responsiveness to the voice of communities in maternal, neonatal and child health services

Community Health Workers (CHW): namely, shasthyashebika, Newborn Health Worker, shasthyakormi and Community Skilled Birth Attendant (CSBA) are the frontline workers catering to family planning, pregnancy related care, childcare of newborns and children under fivein the household.. A change in behaviour towards healthy practices in terms of reproductive health, nutrition, hygiene and sanitation is the strategy to preventive and promotive care. CHWs offer basic care eg, antenatal care, delivery care, postnatal care, newborn care and management of birth asphyxia, diarrhoea, ARI and some common ailments. CSBA attends home deliveries to ensure safe maternal and neonatal outcome at birth. By bridging gaps between community and facility during emergencies,a well structured referral system is put in place to reduce delays in accessing health care UNICEF is working with the government at hospitals and health facilities to improve health care. In essence, a continuum of care is provided to mothers, neonates and children under-five.

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Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health Programme

MNCH2

The programme intervention started in 2005 as a pilot initiative in Nilphamari district.  The intervention is mainly aimed at providing basic primary healthcare at the community level, working with village health committees to motivate behaviour change in the committee by addressing issues of pregnancy, newborn and child health, and facilitating access to obstetric and newborn care at public and private facilities. 

Aligned with the growth of the programme, the MNCH Programme has been divided into two components: ‘Manoshi’, MNCH (Urban), which currently works in city slums of nine city corportations and IMNCS (MNCH Rural) which currently works in 14 defined districts.

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Essential Health Care (EHC)

 

EHC

Essential health care (EHC) is the foundation of BRAC's health programme, combining promotive, preventive and basic curative services. EHC has revolutionised the primary healthcare approach in Bangladesh, reaching millions with low cost basic health services through BRAC's frontline community health workers.

EHC aims to improve reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health along with the nutritional status of women and children. The programme further aims to reduce vulnerability to infectious, communicable diseases and non-communicable diseases. The programme provides primary healthcare services including maternal and child healthcare, basic treatment for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and promotes family planning methods and safe delivery practices. Use of proper sanitation, safe drinking water, hygiene-specific messages are also disseminated among communities.

The EHC programme has partnered with different government agencies under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to observe national health-specific days and events of instruction across the country. Collaboration with the government to promote family planning, immunisation of children and distribution of vitamin A capsules within communities are a few of the many successes of the programme.

Currently the programme is operating in all 64 districts of the country and delivering healthcare services to over 120 million people, in turn serving as a platform for other health interventions.

Essential Health Care Programme for CFPR-TUP
In Bangladesh, 8 per cent of the population is suffering from extreme poverty. Their health status lags far behind that of the general population.  Essential Health Care (EHC) services for the ultra-poor under Challenging the frontiers of poverty reduction – Targeting the ultra poor programme (CFPR-TUP) is specially designed to meet the needs of extremely poor households unable to access or benefit from traditional development interventions.

The goal of the programme is to reduce the vulnerability of the poor and ultra-poor to sudden health problems and to prevent them from sliding back into the vicious cycle of extreme poverty

The programme aims to increase access to health services, through demand-based strategies and by providing a package of basic health services which meets the needs of the ultra-poor.

The ffinancial constraint of the ultra pooris a major impediment in accessing available health services. To address this problem BRAC has introduced the provision of financial assistance to the ultra-poor so that they can access medical care from government or other health facilities.

Community participation is ensured in the programme through community forums (Gram Daridro Bimochon Committee) which form an organised network for the improvement of health and the social status of the rural poor in each village. Committee members actively provide motivation and financial support to the ultra-poor for accessing different health services.

 

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Overview

 

Overview

Bangladesh has made remarkable strides in healthcare in the four decades since independence. Since the 1990's maternal mortality has dropped from 574 to 194 deaths per 100,000 live births, and child mortality from 133 to less than 32 per 1,000 live births. Over four decades, the contraceptive prevalence rate has gone up seven to eightfold. In the 1980's, when immunisation coverage was two per cent, the shared roles and activities of BRAC and the government improved the status to 70 per cent within the last four years. The current status of fully immunised children is at 86 per cent. Despite the achievements, Bangladesh still suffers a high burden of deaths and diseases. Over 70 per cent of people seek care from informal health care providers and 62 per cent of those health providers practicing modern medicine have little or no formal schooling. One thirds of births take place at home, mostly assisted by unsupervised, untrained birth attendants. Recognising these problems, we have created a pool of frontline community health workers, the shasthya shebikas and shasthya kormis, who strive to address the crisis of human resources in the health sector by playing a substantial role in providing accessible and affordable services to the majority of the population.

Initiated in 1991, Essential Health Care (EHC) has revolutionised the primary healthcare approach in Bangladesh reaching millions with low cost basic promotive, preventive and curative services through our cadre of frontline community health workers. The goal of EHC is to improve access to essential health services through delivering community care and organising a bridging network with public healthcare system. Shashtyashebikas and shasthyakormis are mainly part of Essential Health Care (EHC) Programme. In fact, EHC is the basic platform of Health, Nutrition and Population Programme. All health interventions of BRAC are fundamentally based on the platform of EHC programme. To provide these services to the doorstep of millions of people would have required huge investment in the traditional system because of the large number of employees involved in the system. However, EHC developed a very innovative entrepreneurship model where the primary service deliverer (shasthyashebika) provides voluntary service. Although they do not receive any salary or monthly stipend, they are provided with financial incentives on the sale of basic medicines and selected health commodities to their community. This low cost innovative service delivery strategy has attracted various donors and partners in BRAC’s health programme because BRAC can deliver the service very effectively with a much lower cost.  

We have started maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) programmes in 2005 as a pilot project and has been scaled up to 11 city corporations and14 rural districts in partnership with the government, UKAID and Australian High Commission. We have demonstrated that with limited resources, it is possible to change behaviour and practices to lower the incidences of maternal and neonatal deaths within a short period. With the active engagement of community health workers and birth attendants, we ensure high coverage of antenatal and postnatal care while supporting skilled birth attendance. More importantly, an innovative referral system is developed which facilitates transfer of acute emergency cases to hospitals. Within three to four years, we have observed a decline in maternal and neonatal deaths in both urban slums and rural districts.

Bangladesh has made a remarkable progress toward tuberculosis control since the inception of the Directly Observed Treatment Short- course (DOTS) strategy in 1993. In 1994, BRAC became the first NGO in the country to sign a memorandum of understanding with the government and expanded DOTS services across the country through its diversified partners. The national TB control programme in Bangladesh has established effective partnership with the consortium of 43 NGOs led by BRAC to implement the programme throughout the countries. BRAC has been working in 297 sub-districts of 42 districts with the coverage of 93 million population. In BRAC supported areas, all forms of TB case notification rate has increased from 105 to 129 /100,000 population per year. From 2004 to 2013, more than 1.5 million TB patients have been treated; yielding present treatment success rate 93 per cent in BRAC supported areas which has exceeded the national target (85 per cent) and is the second highest treatment success rate in the world Bangladesh has also improved case notification for child TB, smear negative TB, extra-pulmonary TB and drug resistant TB.  The contribution of shasthya shebika in detecting presumptive TB cases, collecting sputum for lab diagnosis and DOTS for TB is tremendous. The Global Fund plays important role to control TB programme in Bangladesh. Growing challenges like TB/HIV co-infection, TB/diabetes are also being prioritised. More initiatives will be taken to address vulnerable communities including people with high risk behaviour and marginalised socially excluded people for TB care services. Urban TB programme is also given special attention for further strengthening of the programme.

The malaria control programme is on track in terms of MDG targets and has shown considerable success among the people at risk from malaria. The National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) established an effective partnership with the consortium of 21 NGOs led by BRAC to implement the programme in 70 sub-districts of 13 endemic districts. Through the funding of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) and Health, Population and Nutrition Sector Development Program (HPNSDP) of government of Bangladesh, the malaria control activities were scaled up and the quality of preventive, diagnostic and treatment services have been improved. BRAC is directly implementing the programme in high endemic three Chittagong hill tracts districts and in 2 sub-districts of Moulvibazar. BRAC’s community based models applied in malaria programme using a large workforce of local shasthya shebikas and shasthya kormis in managing malaria patients at doorstep, raising awareness on malaria prevention and health service utilisation. Malaria cases were reduced by 68per cent in 2013 comparing to baseline year 2008 and whereas death was reduced by 90 per cent at the same time. A total of 3,735,905 long lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) were distributed and 4,231,689 ordinary bed nets were treated with insecticide in the same period. Recent malaria prevalence survey conducted in 2013, documented the decreasing of point prevalence of malaria from 4 in 2007 to 1.41 in 2013 per 1,000 populations based on RDT in malaria endemic districts. A good utilisation rate (>85 percent) of insecticidal bed net was observed among pregnant women and children under 5 years of age.

Malnutrition among children is one of the major problems of our country. To mitigate this problem, BRAC’s nutrition programme has been working at household and community level for creating awareness on nutrition. BRAC’s shasthya shebika and nutrition promoters visit households in their communities and provide counselling, coaching and demonstration. Moreover, they offer community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) service to mother and child of 6 to 59 months who are affected by moderate accurate malnutrition by providing supplementary food. Nutrition programme creates awareness about adolescent girls’ nutrition and encourages mothers and family members about many issues like intake of healthy and various types of food, early initiation of breast feeding, exclusive breast feeding till 6 months, breast feeding for at least two years and initiation of complementary feeding after six months. Moreover, to prevent child malnutrition and anaemia, micro-nutrient powder sachets are distributed under maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN)home fortification programme. It helps to prevent anaemia of 6 to 59 months old child by providing required iron, vitamin and minerals.

In Bangladesh, around seven hundred thousand people suffer from cataract blindness. Moreover, around one fifty thousand people are becoming blind every year. BRAC started ‘Vision Bangladesh’ project with the aim to remove the backlog of cataract blindness. In this programme, cataracts are identified through local eye camp and patients are sent to various government and private hospitals for operation. Community health workers visit household in their community and aware people about eye problems. And if there is any complex case, they send the patients to nearby hospitals or health centres. Moreover, BRAC’s ‘Reading Glass for Improved Living’ project has been providing reading glasses to the people whose vision has become blurred due to age.

Download BRAC Health, Nutrition and Population programme at a glance as of December 2016

 

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IDP for Char Development and Settlement

IDP Char Dev Front Image
The char areas, which fall under the Char Development and Settlement Project-IV(CDSP-IV)  are highly vulnerable to sudden and forceful flooding as well as erosion and loss of land; this makes living in the chars both hazardous and insecure. Many char dwellers struggle to produce or buy enough food to eat, thus resulting in malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, which are more common in these areas than the rest of country. BRAC is implementing  CDSP-IV, which is a multi-sectoral project financed by IFAD, Government of Bangladesh and Government of the Netherlands. Launched in January 2012, CDSP-IV targets marginalised people for in four chars, such as Char Ziauddin, Char Nangulia, Noler Char, and Caring Char in Noakhali district.

Specific objectives of IDP CDSP-IV are:
•    Providing essential services to support poverty reduction that cannot be supported by government agencies at this early stage of development in CDSP areas.
•    Providing microfinance services to enable the poor to take advantage of an improved environment and infrastructure.
•    Supporting government agencies implement CDSP IV, including clean water and sanitation. Promoting human rights and legal awareness, especially for women
Components: Water and sanitation; legal and human rights; health and family planning; disaster management and climate change; homestead agriculture and value chain development; group formation, microfinance and capacity building

Geographical coverage
The project covers 80 villages, in four unions. Six branches in Subarnachar and Hatiya sub-districts in Noakhali district provide support to 11,183 households with 61,446 people.

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IDP for Indigenous People

 

 

Bangladesh is a country of different ethnic communities and cultures. Indigenous people with their distinct traditions, livelihood and living have enriched the cultural diversity of the country. But like many other countries in the world, indigenous people in Bangladesh continue to be disproportionately represented in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of society, experiencing a history of discrimination and marginalization. The situation for indigenous people in plain-land districts of north-western Bangladesh are worse; there remains a very high rate of poverty, landlessness and absence of targeted development interventions. Their livelihood options are very limited, and many indigenous families have been removed from their

ancestral homesteads by locally influential land-grabbers. This situation is further aggravated when the issues of human rights and policy negligence become constant realities in their daily life. BRAC’s integrated development programme for indigenous people aims to empower them through improved livelihood opportunities, protecting and promoting indigenous cultural practices, building leadership capacity and advocating for indigenous peoples’ issues among the wider community.

Goal and Objectives:
The goal of the IDP-IP project is to Empower the poorest and most marginalized communities of indigenous peoples living in the plains of Bangladesh gain greater access to and control over resources, decisions and actions. To achieve the goal, following objectives are envisioned:

  • To improve livelihood conditions of indigenous persons through skill development, relevant entrepreneurship, and other supports (improved socioeconomic condition).
  • To promote greater unity, cultural integrity, organizational capacity, voice and dignity among communities of indigenous peoples (improved social position)
  • To create awareness on and advocate for indigenous peoples’ issues among non-indigenous community, service providers and policy actors at different levels (improved governance/create enabling environment)

 Geographical Coverage:

IDPRegions

http://brac.net/sites/default/files/idp/map-ind.jpgBangladesh is a country of different ethnic communities and cultures. Indigenous people with their distinct traditions, livelihood and living have enriched the cultural diversity of the country. But like many other countries in the world, indigenous people in Bangladesh continue to be disproportionately represented in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of society, experiencing a history of discrimination and marginalization. The situation for indigenous people in plain-land districts of north-western Bangladesh are worse; there remains a very high rate of poverty, landlessness and absence of targeted development interventions. Their livelihood options are very limited, and many indigenous families have been removed from their ancestral homesteads by locally influential land-grabbers. This situation is further aggravated when the issues of human rights and policy negligence become constant realities in their daily life. BRAC’s integrated development programme for indigenous people aims to empower them through improved livelihood opportunities, protecting and promoting indigenous cultural practices, building leadership capacity and advocating for indigenous peoples’ issues among the wider community.

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IDP for Haor Dwellers

 

The haor basin in north-eastern Bangladesh is one of the poorest regions of the country. It suffers from extensive annual flooding and devastating flash-floods, which limit livelihood opportunities for the poor, including agricultural production and enterprise growth. Haor dwellers are extremely vulnerable and their suffering is heightened by a lack of proper communication and transportation systems, hindering economic growth, access to markets (ie off-farm employment opportunities), and existing social services (ie health and education). The goal of the project is to “improve the socioeconomic condition and livelihoods of 1 million poor and ultra-poor in the Haor Basin by 2020”

haor-mapSpecific IDP Haor objectives:

  • To improve the condition, participation and influence of women in household and community decision making
  • To ensure quality primary education for all children in the IDP operational area.
  • To enhance access to quality essential health, reproductive care and improved water and sanitation practices for haor dwellers
  • To promote diversified and sustainable livelihoods—agricultural farming and micro-enterprises for the poor and ultra-poor
  • Advocacy for strengthening the haor development efforts by all relevant actors including GOB, through knowledge management and dissemination.

Components

1.   Community mobilization and empowerment

-    Community empowerment
-    Promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment
-    Human rights and legal services

2.   Access to quality education for all

-    Pre-primary School
-    Primary School
-    Adolescent development
-    Post Primary and Basic Continuing Education (PACE)

3.   Access to Healthcare and population services, improved water and sanitation facilities

-    Essential healthcare services
-    Maternal health Establish and continuing BRAC Health Centre
-    TB control
-    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene promotion

4.   Livelihood Security and Entrepreneurship Development

-    Agricultural livelihoods—improved agriculture, poultry, livestock and fisheries
-    Microfinance / Financial inclusion
-    Targeting the Ultra-Poor (TUP)
-    Migration
-    Access to natural resources and Government safety net and others Services   

5.  Advocacy, Capacity Building and Knowledge Management

-    Action research
-    Lessons documentation and dissemination
-    Networking and advocacy

 

 

 

 

Geographical coverage
GeoCoverage

Operational strategies

VDOs (Village Development Organizations) will remain as IDP’s core implementation vehicle since the VDOS are viewed by the participants as their solidarity platform and also a one stop service center for all. Each of the VDOs are formed with 25-40 participants living in cluster. One women from each of the households represents their family and participates directly in the project activities.

One Programme Organizer supervises 10 VDOs thus covers about 300-350 Households. Based on the needs of the VDO participants as well as criteria set aside for eligibility for receiving various supports. PO facilitates the whole process of service delivery, training, asset or input transfer, micro-finance support, health support etc. To further strengthen the development efforts of the project as well as to support the VDOs and the VDO members, a Development Support Group (DSG) is formed taking representation from all level of peoples—Local leaders, School Teachers, Opinion leaders, health workers, religious leaders and representative of the VDOs are united together to further push and assist the development of ultra-poor, ensuring project promoted WASH activities, addressing gender related issues like eliminating violence against women and children, women’s participation in development, helping the most poor to receive social protection benefits etc.

While POs are working at the community level, the Area Development Coordinator(ADC), being based at the Union level Area Development Offices, supervises around 15 POs in the area and coordinates all the activities under his disposal. To assist the ADCs, as well as to provide technical support to POs in the field, there are Micro-finance support POs in each of the areas offices. At the apex level of each Upazila under project operation, there is an UDCs (Upazila Development Coordinator) who coordinates the entire activities of the upazila and directly supervises the ADCs, Sector Specialist and a number of trainers based at Upazila. The Sector Specialists are technical experts of their respective discipline and provides technical capacity building supports to POs through formal and on the job training maintaining a matrix-management system with the ADCs. A central team, based at BRAC Head Office, are responsible for providing technical and management support to field team, comprised technical experts, communication specialist, training coordinator, M&E and action research managers. The team is led by the Programme Head who is being supervised by the Programme Director of BRAC. Regular coordination meeting with different tier of staff, field visit, participation in training and sharing events, monthly MIS, Periodic M&E and Action research findings are key tools for IDP project management

 

 

Location-IDP-Haor

 

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Overview

 

Despite significant development and recent economic growth in Bangladesh, haor, char area, and indigenous peoples of plain lands still have a high prevalence of poverty. Various studies have identified these areas as poverty ‘hot-spots’ in the country. Consequently, BRAC has also factored this into their programme strategy as second phase for 2015 through 2020, prioritising the need to reach the most marginalized communities and  contribute to achieve the SDGs  in areas facing extreme deprivation.


Download:

IDP fact sheet

IDP-IP Impact Assesment

IDP-IP Mapping Book

Action Research IDP-Haor

Maneuvering and Escape from the Poverty Trap

IDP Working Paper - Report on the Rapid Assessment

 

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New initiatives

In 2012, the following are the two new initiatives being taken:

A. Sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) programme:
Sexual and reproductive health rights programme started from July 2012 with the consortium of six partners as Oxfam Novib, BNPS, CAMPE, FPAB, HASAB and BRAC. It is a campaign based programme funded by Oxfam Novib, which aims to contribute to the significant reduction of the number of adolescent girls suffering from avoidable maternal deaths and the prevention of other major sexual and reproductive health hazards in both adolescent girls and boys. As the acceptance of contraception in adolescent girls and boys increases, pregnancies are delayed and maternal mortality decreases.

B. Violence against women (VAW):
The violence against women project started from September 2012 in Khulna with the consortium of We Can and Steps towards Development. This capacity building project, with contribution from United Nation Trust Fund (UNTF), aims to enhance the prevention of sexual harassment in public place.

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Publications

GJD developed six docu-dramas on gender discrimination and violence against women; published a booklet on BRAC’s role to end violence against women and children, and GQAL case studies; three pocket books on sexual harassment and a Bengali version on CEDAW and early marriage; a study report titled “From Action Learning, To Learning To Act: Lessons from GQAL by Farah Ghuznavi”; three brochures on sexual harassment in public place, Fatwa and High Court judgment on sexual harassment elimination for the educational institutions and workplaces; and seven posters on different gender issues. GJD has initiated a quarterly publication named `Gender barta’, and also launched an in-depth study on GQAL change assessment.

IEC materials published by gender justice and diversity

Docudrama

SL

Name of the Docudrama

Year of production

1.

Swapnochara (access and control over the property)

2009

 

Protigga (domestic violence)

2009

3.

Agiecholo (sexual harassment)

2010

4.

Alokkhi (discrimination and torture)

2010

5.

Alorpothe (food and nutrition)

2010

6.

Andhobishwas (health and treatment)

2010

7.

Swapnopuron (education)

2010

8.

Dinbodolerdak (work division, recreation and rest)

2010

 

Other publications

Brochure

SL

Name of the Publications

Year of production

 

Against sexual harassment

2010

1.

High court direction on sexual harassment (Bengali)

2011

2.

High court direction on sexual harassment (English)

2011

3.

Fotoya

2011

. 4.

GJD brief

2012

 

Leaflet

SL

Name of the Publications

Year of production

1.

VAW, 16 days campaign

2010

2.

Leaflet against sexual harassment

(for MEJNIN Project)

2011

3.

CEDAW

2011

4.

 International Women’s day 

2012

 

Booklet/Pocket Book

SL

Name of the Publications

Year of production

1.

Booklet on GQAL study report From Action Learning, To Learning to Act: Lessons From GQAL

2009

2.

Booklet on BRAC’s role on violence against women

2010

3.

Booklet on GQAL success stories/cases

2010

4.

Pocket Book on sexual harassment

2011

5.

Pocket Book on CEDAW

2011

6.

Pocket book against early marriage

2012

 

Poster

SL

Theme

Year of production

1.

Work division

2010

2.

Domestic violence

2010

3.

Sexual harassment/teasing

2010

4.

Health and treatment

2010

6.

Education

2010

7.

GQAL main messages

2010

8.

C4D main messages

2011

9.

SHRC main messages

2012

 

Bulletin

SL

Theme

Year of production

1.

SHRC

2012

2.

Gender barta

2012

 

Other documents/report

  1. Mahmud et. al. (2012), Gender Norms and Behaviours in CFPR areas: Assessing the Performance of GQAL in Three Districts, BDI, BRAC University, Dhaka
  2. BRAC (2012a, draft), Narrative Report on Meyeder Jonny Nirapod Nagorikotto (MEJNIN), Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  3. BRAC (2012b, draft), A Journey to Zero Tolerance: Combating Sexual Harassment in BRAC, Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  4. BRAC (2011a, memo), Concepts and Practices: experiences of sexual harassment in BRAC—a survey report, Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  5. BRAC (2011b, memo), Factual Analysis of Sexual Harassment Cases: Year 2006-2010, Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  6. Start, R (2011), BRAC Gender Audit: Final Report, Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  7. Hafiza, S (2011), Engendering BRAC, paper presented at the BRAC Board Gender Retreat in December 2011, Dhaka
  8. BRAC (2011, draft), Achieving the Millennium Development Goals: BRAC Strategy 2011-2015, BRAC, Dhaka
  9. BRAC (2010), Shaking Embedded Gender Roles and Relations: an evaluation of Gender Quality Action Learning program, Research and Evaluation Division, BRAC, Dhaka
  10. BRAC (2010, draft), MEJNIN baseline report, Gender Justice and Diversity, BRAC, Dhaka
  11. BRAC (2008), From Action Learning, to Learning to Act: Lessons from GQAL by Farah Ghuznavi, Gender Justice and Diversity, BRAC, Dhaka
  12. BRAC (2008), Sexual Harassment Elimination Policy, BRAC, Dhaka
  13. BRAC (2008, memo), Discussion report on dropped-out female staff in BRAC, Gender Justice and Diversity (GJD), BRAC, Dhaka
  14. BRAC (2007), BRAC Gender Policy: Towards Gender Equality, BRAC, Dhaka

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