Why we need to aim for more than universal education

As the World Education Forum meets in Incheon, South Korea, it is time to confront some unsettling facts about the state of education in the world today. More than 91 per cent of children of primary school age are now enrolled in school, but progress on educating the remaining 9 per cent has slowed to a near standstill. The numbers have barely moved since 2005, and girls are still disproportionately left behind.

This month, the results from six randomised control trials (RCTs), published in Science magazine highlighted a model of development that is an adaptable and exportable solution able to raise households from the worst forms of destitution and put them onto a pathway of self-reliance. The graduation approach – financial services integrated within a broader set of wrap-around services – is gaining steady recognition for its astonishing ability to transform the lives of the poorest.

Innovation is part of the BRAC DNA.  From oral rehydration therapy to one-room schools, we are constantly looking for ways to push past the conventional wisdom of what is possible.

The introduction and rapid growth of mobile money in Bangladesh has created opportunities for new solutions to poverty.  Last year, with the support of the Gates Foundation, BRAC implemented several pilots incorporating mobile money as part of their design.

Even though Bangladesh has made considerable progress in development over the past four decades, there are still many issues left to grapple – one major concern being safety and security. In an attempt to address some of the problems, Saferworld initiated its community security project in partnership with BRAC in 2012. From five districts, rural women, service providers, youth, and security-related groups read more

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