IDP

IDP (5)

Sunday, 16 October 2016 00:00

The Jibika Project

Jibika-Project

 

In 2014, Chevron announced a USD 10 million commitment to create the Bangladesh Partnership Initiative (BPI), a five-year programme to support economic development for communities in the greater Sylhet region. Working with local non-governmental organisations and international development organisations, BPI aims to design effective and need-based social investment projects through three work streams: enterprise development, workforce development, and enabling growth and opportunity.

The Jibika project, the first of BPI’s enterprise development workstreams is being implemented by BRAC. The project‘s goals are to strengthen governance of community-based self-help groups and subsequently improve livelihoods of the marginalised farming households by promoting entrepreneurship and providing need-based training and guidance. To achieve these results, BRAC is working with over 100 village development organisations (VDOs) located around the regions of Chevron operations.

About the partnership
BRAC and Chevron believe in taking an integrated approach to supporting economic development in areas where they operate. Through Jibika, at least 20,000 people in the community will be given the resources they need to create better lives for themselves. From this group, 1,500 or more clients will establish or expand enterprises.

In addition to providing training in enterprise development and business management, as well as seed funding to VDO members, the Jibika project will establish 20 producer groups around four income-generating trades- goat, duck, and cattle rearing, and vegetable cultivation, of which Jibika will do extensive value chain development work. As part of its social empowerment interventions, the project will provide training on key social issues including dowry and early marriage prevention. Prior to all enterprise development and social programmes, Jibika will focus on improving the governance and developing the capacity of the targeted VDO and their members. The project will leverage BRAC’s integrated development programme by incorporating gender empowerment, health, microfinance, and skills training in agriculture, livestock rearing, and business development.

Objectives

  • Introduce social programming into VDOs and improve access to government services.
  • Create sustainable income and employment opportunities through value chain development in targeted sub-sectors and other need-based income-generating activities, and establish market linkages.
  • Improve the governance and institutionalisation of village development organisations.

 

Coverage

jibika-coverage

 

District

Sub-districts

# Unions

#Villages

#HHs

Total Population

Sylhet

Sylhet Sadar

3

30

1,220

6,648

Maulvibazar

Kamalganj

1

11

549

2,990

 

Sreemangal

2

11

765

4,167

Habiganj

Nabiganj

3

28

1,137

6,195

Total

 

9

80

3,671

20,000

Saturday, 16 January 2016 18:00

IDP for Char Development and Settlement

IDP Char Dev Front Image
The char areas, which fall under the Char Development and Settlement Project-IV(CDSP-IV)  are highly vulnerable to sudden and forceful flooding as well as erosion and loss of land; this makes living in the chars both hazardous and insecure. Many char dwellers struggle to produce or buy enough food to eat, thus resulting in malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, which are more common in these areas than the rest of country. BRAC is implementing  CDSP-IV, which is a multi-sectoral project financed by IFAD, Government of Bangladesh and Government of the Netherlands. Launched in January 2012, CDSP-IV targets marginalised people for in four chars, such as Char Ziauddin, Char Nangulia, Noler Char, and Caring Char in Noakhali district.

Specific objectives of IDP CDSP-IV are:
•    Providing essential services to support poverty reduction that cannot be supported by government agencies at this early stage of development in CDSP areas.
•    Providing microfinance services to enable the poor to take advantage of an improved environment and infrastructure.
•    Supporting government agencies implement CDSP IV, including clean water and sanitation. Promoting human rights and legal awareness, especially for women
Components: Water and sanitation; legal and human rights; health and family planning; disaster management and climate change; homestead agriculture and value chain development; group formation, microfinance and capacity building

Geographical coverage
The project covers 80 villages, in four unions. Six branches in Subarnachar and Hatiya sub-districts in Noakhali district provide support to 11,183 households with 61,446 people.

Saturday, 16 January 2016 00:00

IDP for Indigenous People

 

 

Bangladesh is a country of different ethnic communities and cultures. Indigenous people with their distinct traditions, livelihood and living have enriched the cultural diversity of the country. But like many other countries in the world, indigenous people in Bangladesh continue to be disproportionately represented in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of society, experiencing a history of discrimination and marginalization. The situation for indigenous people in plain-land districts of north-western Bangladesh are worse; there remains a very high rate of poverty, landlessness and absence of targeted development interventions. Their livelihood options are very limited, and many indigenous families have been removed from their

ancestral homesteads by locally influential land-grabbers. This situation is further aggravated when the issues of human rights and policy negligence become constant realities in their daily life. BRAC’s integrated development programme for indigenous people aims to empower them through improved livelihood opportunities, protecting and promoting indigenous cultural practices, building leadership capacity and advocating for indigenous peoples’ issues among the wider community.

Goal and Objectives:
The goal of the IDP-IP project is to Empower the poorest and most marginalized communities of indigenous peoples living in the plains of Bangladesh gain greater access to and control over resources, decisions and actions. To achieve the goal, following objectives are envisioned:

  • To improve livelihood conditions of indigenous persons through skill development, relevant entrepreneurship, and other supports (improved socioeconomic condition).
  • To promote greater unity, cultural integrity, organizational capacity, voice and dignity among communities of indigenous peoples (improved social position)
  • To create awareness on and advocate for indigenous peoples’ issues among non-indigenous community, service providers and policy actors at different levels (improved governance/create enabling environment)

 Geographical Coverage:

IDPRegions

http://brac.net/sites/default/files/idp/map-ind.jpgBangladesh is a country of different ethnic communities and cultures. Indigenous people with their distinct traditions, livelihood and living have enriched the cultural diversity of the country. But like many other countries in the world, indigenous people in Bangladesh continue to be disproportionately represented in the poorest and most vulnerable sections of society, experiencing a history of discrimination and marginalization. The situation for indigenous people in plain-land districts of north-western Bangladesh are worse; there remains a very high rate of poverty, landlessness and absence of targeted development interventions. Their livelihood options are very limited, and many indigenous families have been removed from their ancestral homesteads by locally influential land-grabbers. This situation is further aggravated when the issues of human rights and policy negligence become constant realities in their daily life. BRAC’s integrated development programme for indigenous people aims to empower them through improved livelihood opportunities, protecting and promoting indigenous cultural practices, building leadership capacity and advocating for indigenous peoples’ issues among the wider community.

Saturday, 16 January 2016 00:00

IDP for Haor Dwellers

 

The haor basin in north-eastern Bangladesh is one of the poorest regions of the country. It suffers from extensive annual flooding and devastating flash-floods, which limit livelihood opportunities for the poor, including agricultural production and enterprise growth. Haor dwellers are extremely vulnerable and their suffering is heightened by a lack of proper communication and transportation systems, hindering economic growth, access to markets (ie off-farm employment opportunities), and existing social services (ie health and education). The goal of the project is to “improve the socioeconomic condition and livelihoods of 1 million poor and ultra-poor in the Haor Basin by 2020”

haor-mapSpecific IDP Haor objectives:

  • To improve the condition, participation and influence of women in household and community decision making
  • To ensure quality primary education for all children in the IDP operational area.
  • To enhance access to quality essential health, reproductive care and improved water and sanitation practices for haor dwellers
  • To promote diversified and sustainable livelihoods—agricultural farming and micro-enterprises for the poor and ultra-poor
  • Advocacy for strengthening the haor development efforts by all relevant actors including GOB, through knowledge management and dissemination.

Components

1.   Community mobilization and empowerment

-    Community empowerment
-    Promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment
-    Human rights and legal services

2.   Access to quality education for all

-    Pre-primary School
-    Primary School
-    Adolescent development
-    Post Primary and Basic Continuing Education (PACE)

3.   Access to Healthcare and population services, improved water and sanitation facilities

-    Essential healthcare services
-    Maternal health Establish and continuing BRAC Health Centre
-    TB control
-    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene promotion

4.   Livelihood Security and Entrepreneurship Development

-    Agricultural livelihoods—improved agriculture, poultry, livestock and fisheries
-    Microfinance / Financial inclusion
-    Targeting the Ultra-Poor (TUP)
-    Migration
-    Access to natural resources and Government safety net and others Services   

5.  Advocacy, Capacity Building and Knowledge Management

-    Action research
-    Lessons documentation and dissemination
-    Networking and advocacy

 

 

 

 

Geographical coverage
GeoCoverage

Operational strategies

VDOs (Village Development Organizations) will remain as IDP’s core implementation vehicle since the VDOS are viewed by the participants as their solidarity platform and also a one stop service center for all. Each of the VDOs are formed with 25-40 participants living in cluster. One women from each of the households represents their family and participates directly in the project activities.

One Programme Organizer supervises 10 VDOs thus covers about 300-350 Households. Based on the needs of the VDO participants as well as criteria set aside for eligibility for receiving various supports. PO facilitates the whole process of service delivery, training, asset or input transfer, micro-finance support, health support etc. To further strengthen the development efforts of the project as well as to support the VDOs and the VDO members, a Development Support Group (DSG) is formed taking representation from all level of peoples—Local leaders, School Teachers, Opinion leaders, health workers, religious leaders and representative of the VDOs are united together to further push and assist the development of ultra-poor, ensuring project promoted WASH activities, addressing gender related issues like eliminating violence against women and children, women’s participation in development, helping the most poor to receive social protection benefits etc.

While POs are working at the community level, the Area Development Coordinator(ADC), being based at the Union level Area Development Offices, supervises around 15 POs in the area and coordinates all the activities under his disposal. To assist the ADCs, as well as to provide technical support to POs in the field, there are Micro-finance support POs in each of the areas offices. At the apex level of each Upazila under project operation, there is an UDCs (Upazila Development Coordinator) who coordinates the entire activities of the upazila and directly supervises the ADCs, Sector Specialist and a number of trainers based at Upazila. The Sector Specialists are technical experts of their respective discipline and provides technical capacity building supports to POs through formal and on the job training maintaining a matrix-management system with the ADCs. A central team, based at BRAC Head Office, are responsible for providing technical and management support to field team, comprised technical experts, communication specialist, training coordinator, M&E and action research managers. The team is led by the Programme Head who is being supervised by the Programme Director of BRAC. Regular coordination meeting with different tier of staff, field visit, participation in training and sharing events, monthly MIS, Periodic M&E and Action research findings are key tools for IDP project management

 

 

Location-IDP-Haor

 

Saturday, 16 January 2016 00:00

Overview

 

Despite significant development and recent economic growth in Bangladesh, haor, char area, and indigenous peoples of plain lands still have a high prevalence of poverty. Various studies have identified these areas as poverty ‘hot-spots’ in the country. Consequently, BRAC has also factored this into their programme strategy as second phase for 2015 through 2020, prioritising the need to reach the most marginalized communities and  contribute to achieve the SDGs  in areas facing extreme deprivation.


Download:

IDP fact sheet

IDP-IP Impact Assesment

IDP-IP Mapping Book

Action Research IDP-Haor

Maneuvering and Escape from the Poverty Trap

IDP Working Paper - Report on the Rapid Assessment